Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Ethic>Tactic>Technique, the Iron Dome & Rickson Gracie

 

I was having an interesting conversation the other day that although deceptively brief it had a lot of depth and importance. (How's that for an intriguing lead in?!)

It started with a discussion regarding an Israeli friend (and IDF soldier) and about how he believed that the Israeli Iron Dome missile defense system not only saved thousands of Israeli lives, but that it also saved thousands of lives of the people living in Gaza as well.

How?

Well, his response was that if all of the missiles that were launched at Israel were to have hit their targets, rather than being intercepted by the Iron Dome, then Israel's response would have had to be more immediate and destructive (to Gaza) in order to stop those attacks. So, by having the technology of the Iron Dome, Israel could in fact have more time to address the war with Gaza in a less severe manner then they might have if they didn't have that technology.

I advocate that our Ethics must drive our Tactics, which then dictate our Techniques; rather than having a cool new technique (or technology) and then after using it, trying to determine if it was the correct tactic reflecting the best ethic.

During this conversation I related to the technology and quickly saw that it could also be equated to a person's skill level. Meaning that if we have clarity of ethic along with the confidence and skill (or technology), we can (hopefully) strive to be less violent.

 ...Yes I am aware that this skill and technology can work in the opposite direction as well, being used to oppress, control and destroy. =( 

As I have said to many people in my classes and seminars, "I haven't trained in martial arts my whole life to be MORE violent. I train to hopefully have a better chance of managing conflict with LESS violence."

Some of the nicest people I know are also the most deadly.

I remember the first time I met Brazilian Jiu Jitsu & MMA legend Rickson Gracie. He was the friendliness, most polite guy in the room. When you have the right ethic, are confident and really good you can afford to be the nicest, most respectful person in the room! The same can be said for technology and countries. Let's strive for most good, least harm for everyone.

This inspires me to train, teach and grow.

Keep going,
~Craig

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